VIP lounge, Centre National du Costume de Scene

The original scenography reveals the life of the costume before its entry on stage. Unpacking, fitting, makeup and boarding. The sets of some iconic musicals are evoked in the form of quirky winks in a joyous course, and of course, musical. The exhibition opens with the costumes of five musical comedies straight from Broadway. The “origins” of the musical are thus honored with the costumes of “Anything Goes”, “Cats”, “Pal Joey”, “Holiday Inn” and “A Chorus Line” on loan from Roundabout Theater Company and The Shubert Archive in New York.

Room 1: The King and I
Oscar Hammerstein II’s booklet. Richard Rodgers Music. Directed by Lee Blakeley, sets by Jean-Marc Puissant, costumes by Sue Blane, choreography by Peggy Hickey, lights by Rick Fisher. Théâtre du Châtelet, 2014. In 1862, Anna Leonowens arrived in Bangkok, Siam, with her son Louis to take over as English teacher for King Mongkut’s children. The first feature film based on Anna Leonowens’ true story comes out in 1946 with Rex Harrison playing the role of the king who refuses to play in the “musical” version in 1951 because he has to sing. It’s a young artist by the name of Yul Brynner, almost unknown to the public, who is chosen! He will interpret the king more than 4000 times! As for the sumptuous production of the Théâtre du Châtelet, it had nothing to envy to Broadway or the greatest opera houses. In this “King and I” presented in Paris, the original score was even used, which is no longer the case anywhere because the show lasts three hours and fifteen minutes.

Sue Blane’s costume for the role of the Kralahome in “The King and I”, a musical directed by Lee Blakeley, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2014.

Long coat in gold ottoman with purple motifs, embroidered gold plastron, embossed gold lamé baggy trousers, bordeaux and gold silk belt, gold and violet embossed lamé headdress, gold slippers and detail.

Sue Blane costume worn by Lambert Wilson for the role of King of Siam in “The King and I”. Musical directed by Lee Blakeley, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2014.

Red velvet jacket with applications of sari and gold trimmings, red and gold lamé trousers, glittery red veil belt and garnished with gold metal medallions, gold embroidery headdress on red velvet purse, pair of metal rimmed glasses and detail.

Sue Blane costume for the role of a dancer in “The King and I”. Musical directed by Lee Blakeley, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2014.

Gold sequined bustier, cream chiffon skirt trimmed on gold lamé, matching cape, golden pagoda topped cap, pair of gold earrings.

Room 2: Into the Woods
Booklet of James Lapine. Stephen Sondheim Music. Directed by Lee Blakeley, set by Alex Eales, costumes by Mark Bouman, choreography by Lorena Randi, Olivier Fenwick’s lights. Théâtre du Châtelet, 2014. Created in 1987 on Broadway, “Into the Woods” entangles the fates of famous fairy-tale characters with another story linking everything, that of a couple victim of the curse of a witch. They will meet in the woods in order to realize their dreams. The first shows of “musicals” were inspired by popular culture by choosing story stories like Peter Pan, the Wizard of Oz, etc.

Mark Bouman’s costume for the role of the Wolf in “Into the Woods”. Musical directed by Lee Blakeley, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2014.

Jerkin, kit and panties in leather and brown wool studded, faux fur wolf mask, leather gloves with claws, faux fur leggings and slippers with claws.

Mark Bouman’s costume for the role of Little Red Riding Hood in “Into the Woods”. Musical directed by Lee Blakeley, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2014.

White broderie anglaise dress and red velvet ribbons, red cotton velvet cape adorned with floral decorations and lined with red and blue plaid taffeta.

Room 3: Grease
Booklet and music by Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey. Directed and choreographed by Martin Michel, costumes by Arno Bremers, set design by Eric van der Palen. Mogador Theater, 2017. “Grease” was premiered in Chicago in 1971 and then in an off Broadway theater in February 1972, then Broadway and finally adapted to the cinema in 1978. The story takes place in 1959 in a high school, evoking the student youth of two authors Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey.

Arno Bremers costume for the role of Danny in “Grease”. Musical directed by Martin Michel, Theater Mogador Stage Entertainment France, Paris, 2017.

White t-shirt, black leather perfecto, blue jeans, black belt, Converse blue, sunglasses.

Arno Bremers costume for the role of Frenchy in “Grease”. Musical directed by Martin Michel, Theater Mogador / Stage Entertainment France, Paris, 2017.

Jacket in pink and lamé synthetic fabric with “Pink Lady” back inscription, salmon mesh vest, pink t-shirt, pink skirt, fuchsia orange, white petticoat, fuchsia belt.

Room 4 of the exhibition “Musicals”
This room presents productions made from French works: “Les Misérables” (1980 and 1985), “Notre-Dame de Paris” (1998), “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg” (1964 film) and “The Phantom of the Opera “(1986). “Notre-Dame de Paris” is the show that contributed to the rebirth of a new French genre: the musical show. Unlike the “musical comedy”, the audience first discovers the songs by broadcasting them on the radio. Then, according to their success, the show came on stage with the means of real shows.
Fred Sathal’s costume for the original production of 1998, for the role of Esmeralda in “Notre-Dame de Paris”. Musical comedy directed by Gilles Maheu, Korean production, 2003.

Khaki green stretch lace dress sewn in patchwork and decorated with sequins.

Fred Sathal’s costume for the original production of 1998, for the role of Quasimodo in “Notre-Dame de Paris”. Musical comedy directed by Gilles Maheu, Korean production, 2003.

Large tunic with bump back, and pants in dyed red cotton jersey, patched ribbing, matching shoes.

Room 5: A Little Night Music
Hugh Wheeler’s booklet. Stephen Sondheim Music. Directed by Lee Blakeley, sets by Rae Smith, costumes by Jo van Schuppen, choreography by Andrew George, lights by Jenny Cane. Théâtre du Châtelet, 2010. In 1973, “A Little Night Music” made its first performances on Broadway, inspired by Ingmar Bergman’s film Smiles of a Summer Night (1955). During a Swedish summer night, we witness the setbacks of three generations with romantic intrigues and sentimental jokes that follow one another: a marivaudage in the big bourgeoisie.

Jo van Schuppen’s costume worn by Lambert Wilson for the role of Fredrik Egerman in “A Little Night Music”. Musical directed by Lee Blakeley, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2010.

Jo van Schuppen’s costume worn by Leslie Caron for the role of Madame Armfeldt in “A Little Night Music”. Musical directed by Lee Blakeley, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2010.

Early twentieth century style dress in green velvet lined velvet, ribbon belt decorated with a hydrangea, green sisal hat with feather flowers.

Jo van Schuppen’s costume worn by Leslie Caron for the role of Madame Armfeldt in “A Little Night Music”. Musical directed by Lee Blakeley, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2010.

Early twentieth century style dress in purple satin covered with lace, satin and velvet belt adorned with a flower, black lace gloves, white pearl necklace, rings with purple pearls and multicolored pearls.

Room 6: 42nd Street
Booklet by Michael Stewart and Mark Bramble. Harry Warren Music. Staging and choreography by Stephen Mear, sets and costumes by Peter McKintosh, lights by Chris Davey. Théâtre du Châtelet, 2016. “42nd Street” is a stage adaptation of a 1933 musical film. It was not until 1980 that the Broadway show was created with an addition of songs from Al’s album. Dubin. The story is that of a young, ingenuous dancer who wants to break into Broadway but also a story behind the scenes of a show. On a background of romance and American dream, the story is mostly a pretext to link taps and songs.
Costume Peter McKintosh for the role of Billy Lawlor in “42nd Street”. Musical directed and choreographed by Stephen Mear, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2016.

Green embossed lamé and pants, green gold-laced taffeta vest, black cotton shirt, gold sequined butterfly noede, top hat in taffeta and green lamé, black leather shoes.

Room 7: Cabaret
Joe Masteroff’s booklet. Music by John Kander. Directed by Rob Marshall and Sam Mendes, sets by Robert Brill, costumes by William Ivey Long, choreography by Rob Marshall. Roundabout Theater Company, 2014. “Cabaret” is the musical that marks the beginning of a new era on Broadway and paves the way for more “protesting” talk such as Hair in 1967 denouncing the war in Vietnam. “Cabaret” knows a great success with 1165 performances and eight Tony Awards! The film of Bob Fosse in 1972, with Liza Minnelli, will make it a sulphurous and cult work. The Roundabout Theater Company’s version in 1998 was a success (2,377 premiere performances on Broadway).

Room 8: Candid
Lillian Hellman’s booklet. Leonard Bernstein Music. Directed by Robert Carsen, sets by Michel Levine, costumes by Buki Shiff, choreography by Rob Ashford, lights by Robert Carsen and Peter Van Praet. Theater du Chatelet, 2006. Based on the eponymous philosophical tale of Voltaire, “Candide” is a comic operetta premiered on Broadway in 1956 on a libretto by Lillian Hellman and a music by Leonard Bernstein. The “musical” was revised by Hugh Wheeler in 1973. At the premiere of “Candide” on Broadway, December 1, 1956, the opening written by Bernstein was so successful that the show was stopped to allow the public to continue to applaud violently. This opening remains one of the most beautiful ever written for Broadway.

Room 9: Follies
James Goldman’s booklet. Stephen Sondheim Music. Directed by Olivier Bénézech, sets by Valérie Jung, costumes by Frédéric Olivier, choreography by Caroline Roëlands, lights by Marc-Antoine Vellutini, video creations by Gilles Papain. Opéra de Toulon, 2013. Created on Broadway in 1971, “Follies” is the story of the members of a troupe of former girls from a Broadway revue that finds itself 30 years later before the destruction of their old theater. It will bring back nostalgia, old loves, the fear of aging, jealousy … The title of this musical pays homage to the “Follies” of Florenz Ziegfeld who launches, from 1907, the most beautiful and the most impressive reviews in world inspired by Parisian “Folies Bergère”.
Costume of Frédéric Olivier for the role of a dancer in “Follies”. Musical comedy staged by Olivier Bénézech, production of the Toulon Opera, 2013.

Black tailcoat cardigan with black sequin collar, black bra with ruched hem, black sequined panties skirt, silver spangled cuffs, silver glittered choker neck, black top hat with gold glittery braid .

Costume of Frédéric Olivier worn by Nicole Croisille for the role of Carlotta in “Follies”. Musical comedy staged by Olivier Bénézech, production of the Toulon Opera, 2013.

Pink satin long dress trimmed with sequins, large fancy beaded collar, mounted on frame.

Room 10: My Fair Lady
Alan Jay Lerner’s booklet. Frederick Loewe Music. Directed by Robert Carsen, set by Tim Hatley, costumes by Anthony Powell, choreography by Lynne Page, lights by Adam Silverman, dramaturgy by Ian Burton. Théâtre du Châtelet, 2010 and 2013. Created in 1956 in New York with Julie Andrews, My Fair Lady was brought to the screen in 1964 with Audrey Hepburn. Called “perfect musical”, it corresponds, with West Side Story, to the peak of the “golden age” of Broadway. My Fair Lady recounts the meeting between Eliza Doolittle, a young florist and Henry Higgins, professor of phonetics. Following a bet with one of her friends, Higgins will collect the young woman and turn her into a duchess.
Anthony Powell’s costume for the role of Eliza Doolittle for Ascot races in “My Fair Lady”. Musical comedy staged by Robert Carsen, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2010 – 2013.

Dress with ruffles and draped belt in ecru silk organza with red polka dots, horsehair and ecru organza with red polka dots.

Anthony Powell’s costume for the role of Eliza Doolittle for the ball in “My Fair Lady”. Musical comedy staged by Robert Carsen, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2010 – 2013.

Long cape in black velvet lined with white fur.

Room 11: The Sound of Music
Book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse. Richard Rodgers Music. Directed by Emilio Sagi, sets by Daniel Bianco, costumes by Jesús Ruiz, choreography by Miles, lights by Caetano Vilela. Théâtre du Châtelet, 2009. In Salzburg, Austria, just before the Second World War, Maria Rainer entered the convent but did not have the vocation. She becomes governess of the seven children of Captain von Trapp. They fall in love and get married. The family will enjoy a singing festival in Karlzberg to escape Austria and escape the Nazis. This musical is inspired by a true story.
Costume of Jesús Ruiz for the role of Baroness Elsa Schraeder in “The Sound of Music”. Musical comedy directed by Emilio Sagi, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2009-2011.

Strapless tulle flesh embroidered with gold sequins, long satin flesh skirt, ostrich feather boa, coral satin gloves, rhinestone bracelets

Costume of Jesús Ruiz for the role of Friedrich von Trapp in “The Sound of Music”. Musical comedy directed by Emilio Sagi, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2009 and 2011.

White cotton shirt, “Austrian” panties in “curtain” fabrics, blue background with red and gold patterns.

Room 12: Singin ‘in the Rain
Ian Burton’s booklet. Music by Arthur Freed and Nacio Herb Brown. Directed by Robert Carsen, set by Tim Hatley, costumes by Anthony Powell, choreography by Stephen Mear, lights by Robert Carsen and Giuseppe Di Iorio. Théâtre du Châtelet, 2015. At the time of the arrival of the talking cinema, a couple of silent movie stars, Don Lockwood and Lina Lamont, must learn to speak and play comedy. Lina, with the voice of rattle, is doubled by Kathy Selden, whose Lockwood fell in love. But Lina does not want to leave her place … The Théâtre du Châtelet’s production makes reference to the silent cinema of the 20-30’s by offering black and white costumes.
Anthony Powell’s costume for the role of Lina Lamont in “Singin ‘in the rain”. Musical comedy staged by Robert Carsen, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris 2015-2017.

18th century style basket dress, made of fashioned silver lamé covered with embroidered black tulle, white lace, engaging silver tulle, rhinestone necklace, white pearl necklace.

Anthony Powell’s costume for the role of Kathy Selden in “Singin ‘in the rain”. Musical comedy staged by Robert Carsen, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris 2015-2017.

Body in lycra flesh embroidered with silver sequins and rhinestones, iridescent glittered white tulle skirt and feathers, high white ostrich feather headdress and silver sequins, light gray “salomé” shoes.

Anthony Powell’s costume for the role of Lina Lamont in “Singin ‘in the rain”. Musical comedy staged by Robert Carsen, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris 2015-2017.

1930s style dress in silver and black sequins, white fake fur coat adorned with silver rhinestones, black pouch and silver rhinestones, beaded headband, black sequins and rhinestones, rhinestone necklaces.

Room 13: 42nd Street
Booklet by Michael Stewart and Mark Bramble. Harry Warren Music. Staging and choreography by Stephen Mear, sets and costumes by Peter McKintosh, lights by Chris Davey. Théâtre du Châtelet, 2016. For the beginning of the show, Gower Champion has a great idea: the stage curtain rises sixty centimeters and reveals dozens of legs that start a number of clappers. The curtain then rises completely, and there is an audition for “Pretty Lady”, with no less than thirty-six chorus girls and boys! The scenographers of the exhibition took up this idea in this room which symbolizes the beginning of the show.

The costumes presented are those of the Théâtre du Châtelet (2016) production, recreated by Stephen Mear, who was a dancer in the original London production. The production was sumptuous and flashy; one of the biggest successes of the Châtelet. Costumer, Peter McKintosh, points out that he was inspired by pictures of New York in the early 1930s, as the city was changing, during the Great Depression. Follows an avalanche of magnificent costumes and Art Deco decorations.

Costume Peter McKintosh for the role of a dancer in “42nd Street”. Musical directed and choreographed by Stephen Mear, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2016.

White and silver brooch basket dress, white pattern application, rows of pearls, high wig in tulle and white horsehair, red fantasy stone.

Peter McKintosh’s costume for the role of a dancer in “42nd Street”. Musical directed and choreographed by Stephen Mear, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2016.

Short satin jacket with silver polka dots, black cuffs and cuffs with silver dots, black vest with silver polka dots, white shirt, sequined black bow tie, black chiné silver pants with a baguette.

Costume Peter McKintosh for the role of a dancer in “42nd Street”. Musical directed and choreographed by Stephen Mear, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, 2016.

Gold satin bodysuit with silver dots, black back with silver polka dots, gold petticoat with silver dots, gold shoes.

National Center of Stage Costume
Centre National du Costume de Scene (CNCS), is a French museum dedicated to stage costumes and sets.

It was inaugurated on 1 July 2006 in Moulins, Allier by Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres the Minister of Culture, Pierre-André Périssol the mayor of Moulins and Christian Lacroix, dressmaker and board chairman. The current director is Delphine Pinasa, whose portrait is exhibited at the museum.

The National Center of Stage Costume is the first preservation structure, in France or abroad, to be entirely devoted to the material heritage of theaters.
Its mission is the preservation, study and valorization of a heritage collection of 10,000 theater, opera and ballet costumes in addition to painted stage sets, provided by the three founding institutions of the center, the National Library of France, the Comédie-Française and the National Opera of Paris. The center has also received numerous donations from artists and theaters.

Collections
Made up of around 10 000 costumes and scenery elements from the middle of the 19th century to the present day, the collections come from theatres, operas, ballets like the national Opera of Paris, the Comédie-Française and the National Library of France.

The museum has a collection of Rudolf Nureyev’s costumes, as requested in his will to be a “place of memory”. Nureyev, who has been the Paris Opera Ballet director had wished to have his collection placed in a museum in Paris, but suitable locations could not be found. So, his collection was placed in the museum in this Auvergne region museum, which is about 3 hours by train from Paris. It is “a permanent collection that offers visitors a sense of his exuberant, vagabond personality and passion for all that was rare and beautiful.” The collection has historical artifacts from Nureyev’s career including film and photograph material, in addition to 70 costumes.

Stage costumes
Several stage companies and theatres, including the Comédie Française and Paris Opera, send their costumes to the museum after their final show. At the museum they are available to be exhibited and preserved. They are also available to researchers and students for study.

The collections: the memory of legendary institutions and artists
Even if stage costumes represented a most important heritage in terms of expenditure and property for the theatres, there had never been a real policy of protecting them until the creation of the center. They bear witness to the creativity of the costume designers that drew them and the know-how of the workshops that made them. They carry in them the traces of the artists that enhanced them on stage.

The oldest costumes date back to the 18th century. They are authentic clothes (male frock coats and waistcoats) given to or bought by the Comédie-Française after the French Revolution to be used in a repertory of 18th century inspiration (Marivaux, Beaumarchais…). In addition to these exceptional pieces, the collection includes mostly costumes from productions created since the second half of the 19th century. The project originated in 1995 when the Ministry of Culture and Communication solicited the major national institutions, the National Library of France (Performing Arts Department), the Comédie-Française and the National Opera of Paris to constitute the first collection made up of 8500 costumes for the opening of the CNCS.

The collection provided by the National Library of France reflects the richness and variety of the Performing Art Department’s collection. It includes the costumes of the Renaud-Barrault troop, the Théâtre de l’Atelier under the direction of Charles Dullin, the Théâtre du Campagnol directed by Jean-Claude Penchenat in addition to Philippe Guillotel’s costumes for the Albertville Olympic Games dramatized by Philippe Decouflé, in 1992.

The collection of the Comédie-Française covers three centuries of the history of this great theatre. The costumes were made in well-renowned sewing workshops notably for the historical clothing. Certain were created by Suzanne Lalique, Lila de Nobili or Thierry Mugler and worn by Sarah Bernhardt, Mounet-Sully or Jean Marais…

The collection of the National Opera of Paris includes 5000 opera and ballet costumes covering a period of a hundred and fifty years from 1872, with costumes designed by Bakst, Benois, Derain, Cocteau… Most of them were made in the sewing workshops of the opera and worn by all of the greatest stars, Serge Lifar, Yvette Chauviré, Maria Callas, Rudolf Nureyev, Régine Crespin, Luciano Pavarotti…

The CNCS houses an exceptional collection of around 2000 drawings and models of costumes created by Christian Lacroix for stage (opera, dance and theatre). The fashion designer Frank Sorbier has also donated his costume models for two operas, the Traviata and The Tales of Hoffmann.

A collection of stage scenery elements
The National Center of Stage Costumes and Scenography houses a collection of painted canvases, decorative elements and stage machinery (chassis, lifting equipment, masts, praticables, tools) dating from the middle of the 20th century. In this continuity, several contemporary dance troops have bequeathed some of their stage sets along with their costume donations.

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